Chaos is the nature of the universe

Edgar Blackmon and Ross Bryant after performing their "Struggle Rap." /Photo by Clayton Hauck for Second City
Edgar Blackmon and Ross Bryant after performing their “Struggle Rap.” Photo by Clayton Hauck for Second City

VIENNA, 1918 – A young woman arrives late to her music lesson and is immediately scolded by her cantankerous music teacher, who she secretly loves. As he lectures her on the importance of being punctual, she slowly removes her broken violin from its case in preparation for the lesson.

Blind, the music teacher doesn’t know her instrument is ruined until she attempts to play. He quickly catches on, and also begins to see that she is in love with him. “He’s like my salami – a mystery inside,” she sings sweetly, drawing the bow delicately across the violin’s severed strings. “Play on, my love!” he belts out, revealing his mutual affection.

The Second City’s 101st Revue, “Let Them Eat Chaos,” is filled with humorous yet unexpectedly sentimental sketches like these. Played by Ross Bryant and Nicole C. Hastings (filling the roles normally played by Holly Laurent), the Austrian teacher and student are just one odd couple among many used to illustrate the show’s running theme, “you’re always someone to someone.”

“Let Them Eat Chaos” opens with the entire cast – Bryant, Hastings, Edgar Blackmon, Steve Waltien, Niccole Thurman (in the role normally performed by Tawny Newsome) and Chelsea Devantez (her role is normally played by Katie Rich) – appearing onstage and taking a suggestion from the audience. An audience member shouts “turtle,” and the ensemble immediately begins to improvise scenes revolving around the word. From this point on, the actors segue seamlessly from one sketch to another.

Continue reading Chaos is the nature of the universe

Advertisements